Categories

Tag: stereotype

  • Social Class is Dead. Long Live Social Class! Stereotype Threat among Low Socioeconomic Status Individuals

    1/1/07 - Spencer, Bettina, Castano, Emanuele

    Stereotype threat effects occur when members of a stigmatized group perform poorly on a task because they fear confirming a negative stereotype that is associated with their ingroup. The present study investigates whether the observed achievement gap in standardized testing between high- and low-socioeconomic status (SES) American students can be due, in part, to this phenomenon. Participants were placed in one of four conditions that varied in level of “threat” related to socioeconomic...

  • Beyond the Laboratory: Evaluating the Survey Evidence for the Disidentification Explanation of Black-White Differences in Achievement

    1/1/04 - Morgan, Stephen L., Mehta, Jal D.

    The black-white gap in achievement, as measured by performance on standardized tests, has received considerable attention from researchers in the past five years. Claude Steele's stereotype threat and disidentification mechanism is perhaps the most heralded of the new explanations for residual racial differences that persist after adjustments for social background are performed. Analyzing data from the National Education Longitudinal Study, we found qualified support for portions of the...

  • Identity, Belonging, and Achievement: A Model, Interventions, Implications

    1/1/08 - Cohen, Geoffrey L., Garcia, Julio

    In this article we discuss how social or group identities affect achievement. We also present a model of identity engagement that describes how a salient social identity can trigger psychological threat and belonging concerns and how these can produce persistent performance decrements, which through feedback loops can increase over time. The character of such processes may be revealed only over time because they are recursive in nature and interact with other factors in chronically...

  • Is No Child Left Behind 'Wise Schooling' for African American Male Students?

    1/1/03 - McMillian, Monique

    To improve achievement among African American students, education professions must pay special attention to African American male achievement and reframe the academic achievement gap as a treatment gap. Engagement studies suggest that African American students, and African American boys in particular, are susceptible to academic disengagement. Specifically, research (Steele and Aronson 1995; Osborne 1995) suggests that education professionals' "stereotypes about ability" are partly...

  • On Interpreting Research on Stereotype Threat and Test Performance

    1/1/05 - Sackett, Paul R., Hardison, Chaitra M., Cullen, Michael J.

    The authors comment on the comments (see records 2005-03019-016; 2005-03019-017; 2005-03019-018) made on their original article entitled <i>On Interpreting Stereotype Threat as Accounting for African American-White Differences on Cognitive Tests</i> (see record 2004-10043-001). The authors welcome the thoughtful insights of Wicherts, Helms, and Cohen and Sherman, and they hope that these comments stimulate further critical analysis of methodological issues associated with stereotype threat...

  • Performance boosts in the classroom: Stereotype endorsement and prejudice moderate stereotype lift

    1/1/08 - Chatard, Armand, Selimbegović, Leila, Konan, Paul, Mugny, Gabriel

    The present study (N = 293) examined whether stereotype endorsement and prejudice moderate stereotype lift (i.e., a performance boost caused by the salience of a negative out-group stereotype in the testing situation). The stereotype in the focus of inquiry was the belief that immigrant students have lower intellectual ability than native students. French native high school students performed an intellectual test in a condition of low stereotype salience (the test was presented as assessing...

  • Recursive Processes in Self-Affirmation: Intervening to Close the Minority Achievement Gap

    1/1/09 - Cohen, Geoffrey L., Garcia, Julio, Purdie-Vaughns, Valerie, Apfel, Nancy, Brzustoski, Patricia

    A 2-year follow-up of a randomized field experiment previously reported in Science is presented. A subtle intervention to lessen minority students' psychological threat related to being negatively stereotyped in school was tested in an experiment conducted three times with three independent cohorts (N = 133, 149, and 134). The intervention, a series of brief but structured writing assignments focusing students on a self-affirming value, reduced the racial achievement gap. Over 2 years, the...

  • Reducing the Racial Achievement Gap: A Social-Psychological Intervention

    1/1/06 - Cohen, Geoffrey L., Garcia, Julio, Apfel, Nancy, Master, Allison

    Two randomized field experiments tested a social-psychological intervention designed to improve minority student performance and increase our understanding of how psychological threat mediates performance in chronically evaluative real-world environments. We expected that the risk of confirming a negative stereotype aimed at one's group could undermine academic performance in minority students by elevating their level of psychological threat. We tested whether such psychological threat could...

  • Relating test-taking attitudes and skills and stereotype threat effects to the racial gap in cognitive ability test performance

    1/1/03 - Nguyen, Hannah-Hanh D., O'Neal, Alisha, Ryan, Ann Marie

    This research extended past studies on race effects and stereotype threat (ST) effects outside the academic domain, as well as exploring the mediating role of test-related cognition, motivation, and emotionality in the Black-White cognitive ability test performance differences. One hundred seventy-two undergraduates took a simulated personnel selection test and responded to measures of attitudinal and test-taking skills prior to and after the test. Half of the participants were told that the...

  • Stereotype Threat and the Social and Scientific Contexts of the Race Achievement Gap

    1/1/05 - Cohen, Geoffrey L., Sherman, David K.

    Comments on an article by Paul Sackett, Chaitra Hardison and Michael Cullen entitled On Interpreting Stereotype Threat as Accounting for African American-White Differences on Cognitive Tests (see record 2004-10043-001). In their article, Sackett, Hardison, and Cullen (see record 2000-16592-021) critiqued misrepresentations of the original stereotype threat findings presented by Steele and Aronson. They criticized representations of the research that suggest that stereotype threat explains...

  • Stereotype Threat Does Not Live by Steele and Aronson (1995) Alone

    1/1/04 - Steele, Claude M., Aronson, Joshua A.

    This comment notes that P. R. Sackett et al (see record 2004-10043-001) have raised a concern: that 29 mischaracterizations of an experiment from C. M. Steele and J. Aronson (see record 1996-12938-001) spread over 8 years of media reports, journal articles, and textbooks could mislead teachers, students, researchers, policymakers, and parents into believing that the African American-White test-score gap is entirely caused by stereotype and not at all by group differences in opportunities and...

  • Stereotype Threat Undermines Intellectual Performance by Triggering a Disruptive Mental Load

    1/1/04 - Croizet, Jean-Claude, Després, Gérard, Gauzins, Marie-Eve, Huguet, Pascal, Leyens, Jacques-Philippe, Méot, Alain

    Research on stereotype threat has repeatedly demonstrated that the intellectual performance of social groups is particularly sensitive to the situational context in which tests are usually administered. In the present experiment, an adaptation of the Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices Test was introduced as a measure of cognitive ability. Results showed that individuals targeted by a reputation of intellectual inferiority scored lower on the test than did other people. However, when the...

  • Stigma Consciousness and the Race Gap in College Academic Achievement

    1/1/05 - Brown, Ryan P., Lee, Monica N.

    Stereotyped individuals vary in how chronically self-conscious they are of their stigmatized status, a variable called stigma consciousness. The present study examined whether stigma consciousness was negatively related to academic achievement in college for academically stigmatized (Black and Hispanic) students, but not for academically non-stigmatized (White and Asian) students. Results revealed that stigmatized students who were high in stigma consciousness had lower GPAs than stigmatized...

  • Beyond Black and White: The Model Minority Myth and the Invisibility of Asian American Students

    1/1/07 - Wing, Jean

    This study of diverse Asian American students at a racially integrated public high school illustrates that the achievement gap is a multi-racial problem that cannot be well understood solely in terms of the trajectories of Black and white students. Asian American students demonstrated a high academic profile on average, but faced difficulties and failure in ways rendered invisible by widespread acceptance of the “Model Minority Myth,” which says that Asians comprise the racial minority...

  • Bridging the gap between academics & athletics

    1/1/98 - Jones, Dianne C.

    A study at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater examined the validity of the stereotypes that student athletes were inferior students, selected easier majors, and did not graduate. A review of grade point averages proved that the student athletes at the university were not academically inferior to the general student population. A tabulation of majors showed that student athletes did not select perceived "easier" majors than the general student body. Furthermore, an analysis of graduation...

  • Burden of acting neither White nor Black: Asian American identities and achievement in urban schools

    1/1/06 - Lew, Jamie

    Ogbu's theory of "burden of acting white" has been one of the most frequently cited studies to explain black and white achievement gap. However, emerging studies have argued that Ogbu's theory may be limited when examining variability of school achievement among black and white students. Research shows that in addition to culture, other social forces, such as class, peer networks, and school context may play a significant role when accounting for minority students' academic aspirations and...

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