Categories

Journal Article: INCREASING PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOR AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AMONG ADOLESCENT AFRICAN AMERICAN MALES

Categories

AFRICAN American teenage boys, PROSOCIAL behavior, ACADEMIC achievement, HUMAN behavior, TUTORS & tutoring, LEARNING, GROUP counseling, KAUFMAN Test of Educational Achievement, SOCIAL bonds

Authors

Martin, Don; Martin, Magy; Gibson, Suzanne Semivan; Wilkins, Jonathan

Published

2007, Winter2007

Publisher

Libra Publishers Inc.

Abstract

African American adolescents disproportionately perform poorly compared to peers in both behavioral and academic aspects of their educational experience. In this study, African American male students participated in an after-school program involving tutoring, group counseling, and various enrichment activities. All students were assessed regarding their behavioral changes using attendance, discipline referrals, suspensions, and expulsions reports. The Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (KBIT) and the Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement (KTEA) were used to assess the adolescents' improvement in their skills in reading and mathematics. After the end of the two-year program, initial results showed that the adolescents had increased their daily attendance, decreased discipline referrals, and had no suspensions or expulsions. These results also indicated that although the students entered the program at different skill levels, they were assessed to have the ability to function at their appropriate grade level. Their average improvement in basic skills was at least two grade levels. Implications drawn from the findings include: (a) there is a need to emphasize appropriate assessment prior to beginning a skill improvement program; (b) a need to emphasize the use of individualized learning plans and tutors; and (c) a need to further investigate the role of assessment and intervention in after-school programming in order to close the achievement gap. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
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