Categories

Category: Theories

  • Identity and school adjustment: Revisiting the "acting White" assumption

    1/1/01 - Spencer, Margaret Beale, Noll, Elizabeth, Stoltzfus, Jill, Harpalani, Vinay

    It has long been offered as an explanation for the achievement gap between White and African American students, that African American youth would do better if they adopted a Eurocentric cultural values system. Unfortunately, this theory, along with a great amount of the established literature on minority youth identity development, depends on a deficit-oriented perspective to explain the discrepancy between African American and White students. This is problematic because the perspective...

  • Social status and the academic achievement gap: A social dominance perspective

    1/1/01 - Van Laar, Colette, Sidanius, Jim

    In this paper the authors sketch several mechanisms by which low social status is transformed into low academic performance. Using the perspective of social dominance theory, the authors review 3 processes by which this transformation takes place. These processes include (1) the effects of lower economic, cultural, and social capital; (2) the effects of personal and institutional discrimination; and (3) reactions to low social status by members of low status groups. It is argued that members...

  • The Black-White "achievement gap" as a perennial challenge of urban science education: A sociocultural and historical overview with implications for research and practice

    1/1/01 - Norman, Obed, Ault, Charles R., Jr., Bentz, Bonnie, Meskimen, Lloyd

    Explores the academic achievement gap between African American and White students in urban science classrooms. History shows that this gap existed for groups other than African Americans. The authors examine how historical and sociocultural factors in the manifestation and eventual disappearance of the gap for these groups may shed light on the present problem. The authors conclude that the sociocultural position of groups is crucial to understanding the scholastic performance of students...

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