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Category: Academic Underachievement

  • A different view of the IQ-achievement gap

    1/1/76 - Gordon, Margaret T.

    Investigated the relationship between children's IQ and scholastic achievement scores and race, occupational attainment, and social mobility of their parents. The IQ and achievement test scores of 1,102 Chicago area 5th and 6th graders--Black and White, middle- and working-class--were aggregated into 7 cohorts of approximately equal IQ scores. Within these cohorts differences in achievement emerged which could not be attributed to race- or class-linked intellectual discrepancies. Among Ss...

  • Advocacy as a Critical Role for Urban School Counselors: Working Toward Equity and Social Justice

    1/1/05 - Bemak, Fred, Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    The academic achievement gap of students of color and low-income students as compared to middle and upper socioeconomic students and White students has been clearly documented. Historically the long-standing role of the school counselor has contributed to the status quo of these inequities, inadvertently maintaining educational and social disparities. This has been reflected in school counselors' training, role or job descriptions, and actual practice. This article explores the need for a...

  • Counterfeit Social Capital and Mexican-American Underachievement

    1/1/03 - Ream, Robert K.

    A critical issue facing U.S. schools and one with broad social implication is the persistent disparity in educational achievement between racial/ethnic groups. The achievement gap may be particularly pronounced for Mexican-Americans who constitute the vast majority of U.S. Latinos and are among the most educationally at risk of all Latino subgroups. By employing mixed-methods research techniques, this study shows that social network instability accompanying high mobility rates may contribute...

  • Reassessing the "Burden of 'Acting White'": The Importance of Peer Groups in Managing Academic Success

    1/1/03 - Horvat, Erin McNamara, Lewis, Kristine S.

    In 1986 Fordham and Ogbu introduced the idea that Black students continue to underperform in school because of their cultural opposition to "acting White." This notion of the burden of acting White and Ogbu's cultural ecological theory more broadly have provided one of the dominant theories used to explain the Black-White achievement gap. The research presented here offers a reassessment of the burden of acting White and directs researchers to examine the variation to be found in high school...

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